Skip to content

Git Commit: Tutorial for beginners

git commit
Lost in coding? Discover our Learning Paths!
Lost in coding? Discover our Learning Paths!

Understanding Git Commits: A Beginner’s Guide

Welcome to our short Git Commit Tutorial! Here you will learn, which surprise, how to commit git changes.

Ready to get started? Let’s get to it!

Introduction

When you’re starting with version control systems, the concept of committing changes can seem a bit daunting. However, “committing” in Git is one of the fundamental aspects you’ll need to master to maintain a smooth and efficient workflow in any project. This article will break down what a Git commit is, how it works, and why it’s crucial for tracking changes in your projects.

What is a Git Commit?

A Git commit is essentially a snapshot of your project at a specific point in time. Think of it as a save point in a video game—it records the current state of your project so that you can revert to this version if anything goes wrong in the future. Each commit is uniquely identified by a commit hash, a long string of characters that acts like a digital fingerprint.

Why Commit?

  1. Track Changes: Every commit has a message associated with it, usually describing the changes. This makes it easier to track what was done and why, which is especially helpful when multiple people are working on the same project.
  2. Revert Mistakes: If a new code breaks something, you can revert to a previous commit to undo those changes.
  3. Collaborate Efficiently: Commits are the building blocks of collaborative projects. They allow team members to understand each other’s changes and combine them seamlessly.

How to Make a Commit

To create a Git commit, follow these simple steps:

  1. Modify your project: This could involve adding, deleting, or changing files.
  2. Stage your changes: Before you can commit, you need to add these changes to the staging area. Use the command:
    git add <file-name>

    To add all changes at once, use:

    git add .
  3. Commit the changes: Commit your staged changes with a message describing what you’ve done:
    git commit -m "Your detailed commit message"
  4. Push your changes (optional): If you’re working with a remote repository, you’ll want to push your commit to share it with others:
    git push

Best Practices for Commit Messages

  • Be concise and specific: Briefly summarize the change in the first line (50-70 characters), then add a detailed description if necessary.
  • Use the imperative mood: “Fix bug” or “Update file” rather than “Fixed bug” or “Updated file.”
  • Explain what and why, not how: The code change itself explains the how.

Conclusion

Git commits are a powerful tool for managing your code changes. By making frequent commits, you ensure that you can always backtrack to a stable state of your project, understand what changes were made, and by whom. Start committing today, and you’ll find it becomes a seamless part of your coding process.

Understanding Git commits can significantly streamline your development process and enhance collaboration in team projects. Embrace the habit of making thoughtful, well-documented commits and watch the efficiency of your project management soar!

Want to learn more? Read this article here about reverting commits in git.

Oh, and if you feel overwhelmed with coding, check out our developer membership (seriously, it’s worth it!). We help you master coding fast and easily.

Lost in coding? Discover our Learning Paths!
Lost in coding? Discover our Learning Paths!
Learn the worlds most popular web development framework in only a few hours
New course available 🔥
React 18
Learn the worlds most popular web development framework in only a few hours
New course available 🔥
React 18